Signs by Beth Building Portrait in Color

“Let your hook be always cast; in the pool where you least expect it, there will be a fish.”
– Ovid

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2012

Signs by Beth Building Portrait in Color – 8″ x 10″ Watercolor

This building is 100 years old, at least.  It used to be a car dealership.  On homecoming week, when there is a lot of alumni in town, an occasional person will wander in and tell me about what it used to be like.  I love those stories.  I don’t own this building, but I have been leasing it for 15 years.  I operated for 4 years out of my house, then spent a year outgrowing two other locations.  This one suits me perfectly.  It’s right downtown in Eufaula and I love having the large shop to work in.  I’m on the end of the block.  There is a nail salon next door and O’Reilly’s Auto Parts is across the street.  Nelson’s Feed Store is just to the east, across from O’Reilly’s.  It’s a piece of hometown America to the max and I love it!

About Ovid

“Publius Ovidius Naso, the Roman poet known as Ovid, best known for the epic Metamorphoses, is considered one of the greatest poets of Latin literature. He was born in 43 B.C. in what is now Italy. He rose quickly in Roman government and was on track to become a senator when he chose to devote himself to poetry instead. His tale of Pyramus and Thisbe is the source for Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Emperor Augustus exiled Ovid from Rome for unknown reasons in 8 A.D.; he died in exile in 17 A.D. “

Signs by Beth Building Sketch – 8″ x 10″

“A ship in port is safe, but that’s not what ships are built for.”
Grace Murray Hopper

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2012

Signs by Beth Building Sketch – 8″ x 10″

Here’s the initial sketch for the Signs by Beth sock monkey painting.  I wanted to get involved in the sock monkey project and do my building, too.  I am tickled with my jeep.  I never dreamed I’d be able to draw it where you could tell it was a jeep.  he he

About Grace Murray Hopper

Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper, the American computer pioneer, was the first woman to become a Distinguished Fellow of the British Computer Society. She was born in 1906 in New York. By age seven, she was taking alarm clocks apart to see how they worked. She worked for the U.S. Navy developing the first compiler, which allowed people to write computer programs in real language rather than machine code. When she found a moth inside a computer, she coined the term “debugging.” She died in 1992.

Cross Livestock Auction Logo

“Security is a superstition–it does not exist in nature. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure.”
– Helen Keller

Copyright Signs by Beth, LLC 2012

Cross Livestock Auction Logo

I thought I’d do something a little different today.  I have been working on this logo for 2 weeks.  It was hard for the client to settle on the right critter.  The rest of it I had on day 1.  Funny how logo design goes.  This is going to be a great account and is starting with a bang.  Their first auction is Tuesday and they need several signs by then.  So much for my weekend off.   🙂

About Helen Keller

American author and activist Helen Keller was born in Alabama in 1880; she became blind and deaf after a childhood fever. When she was 7, Ann Sullivan famously coaxed her out of her sullen, angry shell and taught her to communicate. From then on, Keller took on the world. She graduated from Radcliffe, traveled the world visiting sweatshops and speaking out for the powerless, helped found the ACLU, and wrote eleven books. She died in 1968.

Eufaula 2011 Art Walk Poster – 11″ x 14 Watercolor

“Face your deficiencies and acknowledge them; but do not let them master you. Let them teach you patience, sweetness, insight.”
– Helen Keller

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2012

Eufaula 2011 Art Walk Poster – 11″ x 14 Watercolor

This is the painting that started the sock monkey craze we have going in Eufaula.  See the red building on the far corner, next to the aqua awning?  That’s Steel Daffodils.  I am currently working on the kinda orangy colored building with no awning.  Now it’s gray with black awnings and it’s Our Favorite Place, the new gallery in town.   If you turn left at Steel Daffodils, the next one I’m doing is State Farm, on the right side of the street.   If you turn right at Steel Daffodils, you’ll see my sign shop on the right.  Yes, there will also be a Signs by Beth painting and who knows who else will jump on the bandwagon.    Fun!

About Helen Keller

American author and activist Helen Keller was born in Alabama in 1880; she became blind and deaf after a childhood fever. When Helen was seven, her teacher, Annie Sullivan, coaxed her out of her sullen, angry shell and taught her to communicate. From then on, Keller took on the world. She graduated from Radcliffe, traveled the world visiting sweatshops and speaking out for the powerless, helped to found the ACLU, and wrote 11 books. She died in 1968.

 

It’s so Hot at these Heights!

There are many ways of breaking a heart. Stories were full of hearts broken by love, but what really broke a heart was taking away its dream – whatever that dream might be.
Pearl S. Buck

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2012

It’s so Hot at these Heights!  – 3″ x 4″ Inktense and Sharpie

The word of the week at Illustration Friday is Heights.  Susan (Surob) at WetCanvas posted a photo of a squirrel, all sprawled out trying to cool off on a hot day.  I thought it was perfect for this week’s theme.  Check back tomorrow for another one.

Are you wondering what Inktense is?  Inktense pencils are like watercolor pencils, except the color is very intense and after it is dry, it’s permanent, like ink.  Here is a photo with part of the sky still in the pencil form.

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2012

Today is the 20th anniversary of Signs by Beth, LLC!  I can’t believe I’ve had my sign shop for 20 years.  I should be celebrating somehow.  Can’t celebrate with the hubby because he has been wanting me to retire for the last 10 years.  My business is the thing that keeps me away from him.  I can see what he means, but it’s still something to be proud of.  WoooHooo!  There!  Celebrated.  🙂

Heights - Illustration Friday

I had to post the photo again, because when Facebook picks this up, sometimes it posts the last photo and I didn’t want the half done sky to show up on Facebook.  😀

Pearl Comfort Sydenstricker was born on June 26, 1892, in Hillsboro, West Virginia. Her parents, Absalom and Caroline Sydenstricker, were Southern Presbyterian missionaries, stationed in China. Pearl was the fourth of seven children (and one of only three who would survive to adulthood). She was born when her parents were near the end of a furlough in the United States; when she was three months old, she was taken back to China, where she spent most of the first forty years of her life.

In 1910, Pearl enrolled in Randolph-Macon Woman’s College, in Lynchburg, Virginia, from which she graduated in 1914. Although she had intended to remain in the US, she returned to China shortly after graduation when she received word that her mother was gravely ill. In 1915, she met a young Cornell graduate, an agricultural economist named John Lossing Buck. They married in 1917, and immediately moved to Nanhsuchou (Nanxuzhou) in rural Anhwei (Anhui) province. In this impoverished community, Pearl Buck gathered the material that she would later use in The Good Earth and other stories of China.

More on Pearl S. Buck can be found here.