A Special Plaid Wine Box – Made With Love

“The one important thing I have learned over the years is the difference between taking one’s work seriously and taking one’s self seriously. The first is imperative, the second is disastrous.”
– Margot Fonteyn

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2013

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2013

A Special Plaid Wine Box

I made this wine box for my friend, Ann.  It’s made from a paper mache wine box (from Hobby Lobby) and a favorite old shirt of mine.  I loved that shirt, so when I wore it out, I washed it and put it in my fabric stash.  I used Mod Podge (by Plaid Enterprises) to put squares of fabric all over the box.  The shirt had tabs, so that when you rolled up your sleeves, you’d button them up with the tabs.  That is what I used for the front.  I removed the buttons from my shirt and hot glued them to the tab.  If you make one of these, be sure to start it below the lid edge or the lid won’t go on.   As it is, you have to use thin layers around the top and bend the box slightly to get the lid on.  I think on the next one, I may just paint around the top of the box.

I attached the collar to the lid with hot glue and added a couple buttons.  I used several coats of Outdoor Mod Podge to give it a hard surface.  (Do the collar, too)  I even hot glued the tag inside the box for an extra bit of fun.  Ann takes wine to barbeques and such, so I thought it would be the perfect gift for her.  It was hard not to keep it.  I could put a water bottle or small coffee thermos in there, in stead of wine.  😀

About Margot Fonteyn

Margot Fonteyn, the elegant British prima ballerina, is considered one of the truly great dancers of our time. She was born in 1919 in Surrey. She made her debut in 1934 as a snowflake in Nutcracker and was a leading ballerina within four years. She flirted with retirement in the late 1950’s until Rudolf Nureyev defected from the Soviet Union; he became her dancing partner for the next decade, a brilliant creative match despite their 20-year age difference. She died in February 1991.


A Charming Old Car and Some Plaid

“If there is a sin against this life, it consists perhaps not so much in despairing of life as in hoping for another life and in eluding the implacable grandeur of this life.”
Albert Camus

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2012

A Charming Old Car – 5″ x 5″ Watercolor & Ink

I painted this from another photo reference from Lin (Old Rock Chick) at WetCanvas.  The plaid was fun.  I just made that part up.  😀

Albert Camus (1913-1960) was a representative of non-metropolitan French literature. His origin in Algeria and his experiences there in the thirties were dominating influences in his thought and work. Of semi-proletarian parents, early attached to intellectual circles of strongly revolutionary tendencies, with a deep interest in philosophy (only chance prevented him from pursuing a university career in that field), he came to France at the age of twenty-five. The man and the times met: Camus joined the resistance movement during the occupation and after the liberation was a columnist for the newspaper Combat. But his journalistic activities had been chiefly a response to the demands of the time; in 1947 Camus retired from political journalism and, besides writing his fiction and essays, was very active in the theatre as producer and playwright (e.g., Caligula, 1944). He also adapted plays by Calderon, Lope de Vega, Dino Buzzati, and Faulkner’s Requiem for a Nun. His love for the theatre may be traced back to his membership in L’Equipe, an Algerian theatre group, whose “collective creation” Révolte dans les Asturies (1934) was banned for political reasons.  More…


A Vintage Car and a Glacial Norwegian Lake

“Behold the turtle. He makes progress only when he sticks his neck out.”
– James Bryant Conant

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2012

A Vintage Car and a Glacial Norwegian Lake – 4″ x 6″ Watercolor and Ink

I had fun with this one.  It’s a combo of two photographs from Rozzi at WetCanvas.  The doors to the car were open in the photo and there were two guys standing on the running boards.  I left all that pesky stuff out.  Oh, and of course the car was black.   🙂

About James Bryant Conant

James Bryant Conant, the American chemist and educator, is known both for his role in the Manhattan Project — which developed the first nuclear weapons — and for his innovative tenure as president of Harvard University. Harvard had been a finishing school for the rich; Conant turned it into a world-class research university and created aptitude tests to choose students by ability. These tests became the basis for the SAT. He was born in Massachusetts in 1893 and died in New Hampshire in 1978.

Plaid and Polka Dots

“Rate the task above the prize; will not the mind be raised? Fight thine own faults, not the faults of others; will not evil be mended?”
– Confucius

Plaid and Polka Dots – 4″ x 4″ Watercolor

I hosted the WDE over the weekend at WetCanvas.  I used photos from the Reference Image Library that started with P.  We had a lot of fun and I did eight paintings.  I threw studying and honey-dos to the wind and just played in my studio.  This photo was titled “Pretty Girl” (by me) and was contributed to the RIL by pencilnpen.  Of course, following the P theme, I added the Plaid and Polka dots.  If I had been thinking ahead, I’d have given her Pigtails.  🙂

I think this is the first child I have painted that didn’t look like a 40 year old hooker.  ha ha ha

About Confucius

The ancient Chinese social philosopher Confucius founded the ethically based philosophical system which became known as Confucianism. Legend says that he was born in 551 B.C. to a 70-year-old father and a 15-year-old mother. At age 50, frustrated with politics, he left his job as Justice Minister and began a 12-year journey around China. Returning home, he taught a growing number of disciples “The Way” and wrote a set of books called the Five Classics. He died in 479 B.C.