Turkey Twins Go Exploring

“Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear — not absence of fear.”
– Mark Twain

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2013

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2013

Turkey Twins Go Exploring

Another one from the archives.  It’s amazing how many varieties of birds I can find when I search through my paintings.   I hope you enjoy them, while I work on current art.

I had twin Banny Roosters once.    Darrell and his other brother Darrell.  They were  really little, but put huge fear in grown men.  They were very protective of me and would chase strange men (like the plumber or phone man) all around the yard.  They were hilarious!!

I love doing my blog every weekday.  I started doing this in 2007 and it’s just a part of my daily routine.  I need to start my day with a positive thought.  It stays with me all day.  I really appreciate those of you who take the time to click on your email message and come visit.  You are the best!!!

About Mark Twain

Samuel Clemens, the iconic American humorist and writer, is better known by his pen name Mark Twain. He was born in 1835 in Missouri. He worked at several jobs, including steamboat pilot and miner. He wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Prince and the Pauper, and other successful novels. His writing captured a very American vernacular and flavor, and helped create a distinctive American literature. He died in 1910.

 

Another Carlton Landing Painting – The Winner’s House – 5.5″ x 8.5″ Watercolor

“Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear — not absence of fear.”
– Mark Twain

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2012

Another Carlton Landing Painting – The Winner’s House – 5.5″ x 8.5″ Watercolor

I have painted this house before.  It’s right across the street from The Meeting House at Carlton Landing.  I tried to find this when Steve and Joann were here, so that I could give it to them, but I couldn’t find it.  I found it this morning.  Now I can give it to them.  Yay!   This is their house, but not their paint choices… of course!  🙂

About Mark Twain

Samuel Clemens, the iconic American humorist and writer, is better known by his pen name Mark Twain. He was born in 1835 in Missouri. He worked at several jobs, including steamboat pilot and miner. He wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Prince and the Pauper, and other successful novels. His writing captured a very American vernacular and flavor, and helped create a distinctive American literature. He died in 1910.

Fantasy Flamingo Boots

“Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great.”
– Mark Twain

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2012

Fantasy Flamingo Boots – Watercolor and Ink

This is one I have not shown you before.  It’s really only a crop of a larger painting, since I’m doing the shoe thing this week.  That is actually a pink flamingo wearing these boots.   See the knobby knees?  I would wear these boots… okay, maybe not.  I am afraid of heights.    😀

Do you know someone who is wanting to start their own blog, but are afraid to try it?  Check out the new link in my blogroll.  How to create a WordPress blog – by Kana Tyler.  Kana is a great writer and she has posted a wonderful tutorial.

About Mark Twain

Samuel Clemens, the iconic American humorist and writer, is better known by his pen name Mark Twain. He was born in 1835 in Missouri. He worked at several jobs, including steamboat pilot and miner. He wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Prince and the Pauper, and other successful novels. His writing captured a very American vernacular and flavor, and helped create a distinctive American literature. He died in 1910.

Laundry in Paradise – 2′ x 4′ Acrylic on Canvas

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did.  So throw off the bowlines.  Sail away from the safe harbor.  Catch the trade winds in your sails.  Explore.  Dream.  Discover.”
–Mark Twain

Laundry in Paradise
2′ x 4′ Acrylic on Canvas

This painting is sooo much brighter in person.  I didn’t get an outdoor photo before it was hung last night.It is hanging in our laundry room, which is also the entrance to the house from the garage.

This painting was requested by the hubby and he normally isn’t a fan of this style, so I am totally happy that he loves it!  He does all the laundry at our house, so if he’s happy, I’m happy!  😀

Here is a photo I took of it before framing.  I laid it on the floor in my studio and stood on a chair.  🙂

A Life Lived in a Rapidly Changing World: Samuel L. Clemens‚ 1835-1910

As Twain’s books provide insight into the past‚ the events of his personal life further demonstrate his role as an eyewitness to history. During his lifetime‚ Sam Clemens watched a young United States evolve from a nation torn apart by internal conflicts to one of international power. He experienced America’s vast growth and change – from westward expansion to industrialization‚ the end of slavery‚ advancements in technology‚ big government and foreign wars. And along the way‚ he often had something to say about the changes happening in his country.

The Early Years

Samuel Clemens was born on November 30‚ 1835 in Florida‚ Missouri‚ the sixth of seven children. At the age of 4‚ Sam and his family moved to the small frontier town of Hannibal‚ Missouri‚ on the banks of the Mississippi River. Missouri‚ at the time‚ was a fairly new state (it had gained statehood in 1821) and comprised part of the country’s western border. It was also a slave state. Sam’s father owned one slave and his uncle owned several. In fact‚ it was on his uncle’s farm that Sam spent many boyhood summers playing in the slave quarters‚ listening to tall tales and the slave spirituals that he would enjoy throughout his life.

In 1847‚ when Sam was 11‚ his father died. Shortly thereafter he left school‚ having completed the fifth grade‚ to work as a printer’s apprentice for a local newspaper. His job was to arrange the type for each of the newspaper’s stories‚ allowing Sam to read the news of the world while completing his work.

See more on Mark Twain at marktwainhouse.org.

 

Sea Turtle Watercolor

“Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions.  Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great.”
–Mark Twain

Sea Turtle – 6″ x 8″ Watercolor

I had a great time painting this.    Of course, just like I don’t have patience for tree painting… I’m the same way with the underwater plants, too.  I just made some up.  😀

This is painted from another one of Li’s Belize photos.

We had a terrific anniversary on Saturday.  We took the retro Tbird for a top down road trip to Van Buren, Arkansas.    We went to our favorite store, A Little Bit of Mexico, owned by Barb and Dave Little, to treat ourselves to some art.  We bought 2 pieces by metal artist, Andres Martin De Campo.  Here is a YouTube video with some of his work on it.   Here is a photo from Facebook of his shop in Mexico, where he uses live models to pose for his art.  One of the pieces we bought is a sea turtle trio, to go over our fireplace.

We had a great day, but couldn’t fit a single one of our purchases in our itty bitty little Tbird, so Barb and Dave delivered our goodies yesterday.   What a fun weekend.

Samuel Clemens, alias Mark Twain, is an American icon whose razor-sharp wit and inimitable genius have entertained countless readers for more than a century.  His many publications include such gallant childhood essentials as The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, along with many dozens of other works ranging from airy magazine columns to focused, biting anti-imperialist satire.

He was born in Hannibal, Missouri in 1835.  The Clemens family consisted of two brothers, a sister, and the family-owned slave, Jenny, whose vivid storytelling was a formative influence on the young Sam.  As he was growing up, his parents explained their perspective on the nature of things in the established South, about the slave-owning tradition, and about ‘rough western justice.’  more…

Aww, Shucks! – Frog Painting

“Twenty years from now you will be
more disappointed by the things
that you didn’t do.  So throw off the bowlines.
Sail away from the safe harbor.
Catch the trade winds in your sails.
Explore. Dream. Discover.”
–Mark Twain

Yeah!!!

Aww, Shucks! – Frog Painting

2.5″ x 3.5″ Watercolor from Anything Goes Exchange

I painted 24 frogs for this exchange in 2008.  Since I am busy working on my art licensing collections, I’ll share these frogs with you, in stead of posting new work.  I’m a little hesitant to reveal too much of my new stuff, before I go to the show.    😀

Mark Twain [pseudonym of Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), quintessential American humorist, lecturer, essayist, and author wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876);

“Tom did play hookey, and he had a very good time. He got back home barely in season to help Jim, the small colored boy, saw next-day’s wood and split the kindlings before supper–at least he was there in time to tell his adventures to Jim while Jim did three-fourths of the work. Tom’s younger brother (or rather half-brother) Sid was already through with his part of the work (picking up chips), for he was a quiet boy, and had no adventurous, trouble-some ways.” Ch. 1

More…..

Very Fine Shoes

“Courage is not the absence of fear; it is the control of fear, mastery of fear.”
Mark Twain

I didn’t know until now that Mark Twain and I share a birthday.  Cool!

Very Fine Shoes

2.5″ x 3.5″ Watercolor ATC

I spent so much time on my Banty, that I didn’t get to paint anything else over the weekend.   I  guess we’ll tip toe through the shoe pile this week and see what else is hiding in there.  When I look at some of these shoes, it amazes me that I put so much detail in that itty bitty little space.  Fun!!!  🙂

Last night, I made it to my flight lesson in McAlester, ready to go up with the remnants of my cold.  I did the pre-flight, the run-up,  and taxied onto runway 02, announcing my intentions on the radio.    All is well.  I begin the takeoff roll, when I notice the airspeed indicator is not working.  I pulled the throttle all the way back and slowly brought the plane to a stop.  No airspeed indicator, no takeoff.  So…. I taxied back to the hangar and we stowed the plane.

Even though it was sad that I didn’t get to fly, it was a great lesson.  It’s not often that a student gets to experience equipment failure in real-time.  We read about it and we are taught about it, but when it really happens, it is burned into our brain cells.  If I hadn’t noticed the airspeed indicator (yeah… like that would happen!),  my instructor was going to let me take off and then we’d learn about how to handle the failure in the air and get the plane safely back.    Maybe next time we can pretend.  🙂

Mark Twain

Name at birth: Samuel Langhorne Clemens

Mark Twain is on nearly everyone’s list of all-time great American authors. Twain was raised in Hannibal, Missouri and as a young man held a series of jobs which included work as a printer’s apprentice, a Mississippi riverboat pilot, and a newspaperman in Nevada and San Francisco. He moved gradually from journalism to travel writing and then to fiction, aided by the success of his 1869 travel memoir The Innocents Abroad. His humorous tales of human nature, especially The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and Huckleberry Finn (1885), remain standard texts in high school and college literature classes. In his own day Twain was a tremendously popular figure and a celebrated public speaker who toured widely. Other Twain classics include Life on the Mississippi (1883) and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court (1889) and the short story The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County (1867).

Twain was born and died in years in which Halley’s Comet passed by Earth: 1835 and 1910… His pseudonym, Mark Twain, was taken from Mississippi riverboat terminology; it’s a measure of depth… Twain married the former Olivia Langdon in 1870; she died in 1904, and the melancholy tone of Twain’s later writings is often attributed to his depression over her death.

Head in the Leaves

“Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear — not absence of fear.”
– Mark Twain

Head in the Leaves

7.5″ x 11″ Watercolor on Hot Press Paper

I didn’t paint enough new paintings this week, to post a fresh one each day, so I looked through my stash to find one I may not have shared with you.  That is such a fun experience, because there are so many experiments in that pile.  I picked this one, because I painted all the way to the edges.  It wouldn’t be suitable for framing, unless I did something else with it.

I can glue it to a large canvas and then come in with some mixed media to bring it to life, such as some acrylic leaves, that meander off of the painting, onto the canvas.  I can use it as the beginning to a collage, or possibly cut it up and do a weave with another painting, being careful to preserve that eye.  Hmmm….. what would you do?  😉

I have to tell you about an  exciting little project I’m working on.  I am taking Laura Bray’s Easy Ezine class.    We are learning all the nuts and bolts of doing a first class newsletter or ezine.  I am loving it so far!  I even increased my website’s subscriber list from 1 to 48.  Wee!   You can sign up here, if you want to receive the very first issue.  🙂

I am planning to do a monthly newsletter that has some art, some how-to’s or something fun that I have learned, and of course, something positively “wiggle your butt” fun!    😀  As a student pilot, I am anxious to share some of the new experiences I’m having in the wild blue yonder, too.

I am going to give away an original painting to one of my subscribers in the first newsletter and will continue to have some kind of monthly freebies.   This is key… you can un-subscribe at any time (if I put you to sleep), but I’m hoping that you’ll send the link to your friends, in stead.  Oh, and I will not share my list with anyone… period!

I am feeling like a little girl with a new party to go to.  If you have any suggestions on things you’d like to see in the newsletter, please leave a comment.  I value all I can learn from you, just as I do with my art.

Okay, just for fun…. let me pop that Sign-Up link in there one more time.  🙂

About Mark Twain

Samuel Clemens, the iconic American humorist and writer, is better known by his pen name Mark Twain. He was born in 1835 in Missouri. He worked at several jobs, including steamboat pilot and miner. He wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Prince and the Pauper, and other successful novels. His writing captured a very American vernacular and flavor, and helped create a distinctive American literature. He died in 1910.

Mushroom Fantasy

“Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions.  Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great.”

Mark Twain

Boy, isn’t that the truth!
Mushroom Fantasy

6″ x 9″ Watercolor on Yupo

This little painting reminds me of a fantasy.  Dreamy and a little distorted.  I had a piece of Yupo that I had previously played with.  Then I just had fun with color and a little imagination.

Here is the background, before I painted the mushrooms.  There is a little difference in color, due to the bad lighting when the photo was taken of the background.  I scanned the final painting.



Mark Twain

On Nov. 30, 1835, the small town of Florida, Mo. witnessed the birth of its most famous son. Samuel Langhorne Clemens was welcomed into the world as the sixth child of John Marshall and Jane Lampton Clemens. Little did John and Jane know, their son Samuel would one day be known as Mark Twain – America’s most famous literary icon.

Approximately four years after his birth, in 1839, the Clemens family moved 35 miles east to the town of Hannibal. A growing port city that lie along the banks of the Mississippi, Hannibal was a frequent stop for steam boats arriving by both day and night from St. Louis and New Orleans.
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Another great quote:

“Twenty years from now, you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

Mark Twain

All Dressed Up

“Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great.”
– Mark Twain

That is so true!  Maybe this is another reason we blog.  🙂

All Dressed Up

2.5″ x 3.5″ Watercolor on Strathmore Textured Paper

This was fun to do in this small size.  I chose the name because no matter how plain the building, when you add a beautiful window, it is all dressed up.

I love stained glass.  I learned how to do it when I was younger, but gave it up because I didn’t have the space to leave it out all the time.  Stained glass is a little to hard to do on the kitchen table between meals.  🙂

About Mark Twain

Samuel Clemens, the iconic American humorist and writer, is better known by his pen name Mark Twain. He was born in 1835 in Missouri. He worked at several jobs, including steamboat pilot and miner. He wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Prince and the Pauper, and other successful novels. His writing captured a very American vernacular and flavor, and helped create a distinctive American literature. He died in 1910.

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