Meandering Geese

“One comes, finally, to believe whatever one repeats to one’s self, whether the statement is true or false.”
Napoleon Hill


Our inner dialogue can have awesome power. It often determines the behavior that defines who we are. We do, of course, have some choice as to the direction this inner dialogue will take. It’s as easy to affirm our self-worth with positive messages as it is to tear ourselves down with negative ones. And yet, many of us fall so easily into negative patterns of thought.

As with so many aspects of our life, we become proficient at what we regularly practice. The regular, preferably daily, use of positive affirmations can make such a profound contribution to our well-being and willingness to grow and learn, that it can change the course of our life. All we have to do is develop the discipline to make these positive messages habitual.”
Karen Casey

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2013

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2013

Meandering Geese
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I have always liked this one.  It’s so simple, yet the geese have personalities.
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My sign shop computer and cutters are all working!!!  Finally!!!    …  01_yippee[1]
The last 2.5 weeks have been testing my ability to remain calm under stress.  I did it, but it was a challenge at times.  Now to play catch up.  Six working days until the 4th of July.  I am always the busiest right before holidays, so let the fun begin!
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More about Napoleon Hill here.
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Karen Casey, Ph.D., a Naples, FL resident since 1991, published Each Day a New Beginning, her first book, in 1982. This daily meditation book for women in recovery has sold more than 3 million copies. The 25-year Anniversary edition of Each Day a New Beginning was released in August, 2006. It was closely followed by The Promise of a New Day, in 1983, another daily meditation book for both men and women in search of serenity. It has sold more than 1.2 million copies. Following on the heels of these two books, Karen has written 22 additional books with more on the way. In fall, 2005 she published CHANGE YOUR MIND AND YOUR LIFE WILL FOLLOW.  In April of 2006 she published ALL WE HAVE IS ALL WE NEED and she published three more books in 2007. SERENITY was released in March. BE WHO YOU WANT TO BE, in April and in December, a companion book to CHANGE YOUR MIND AND YOUR LIFE WILL FOLLOW, called  ITS UP TO YOU: A PRACTICE TO CHANGE YOUR LIFE BY CHANGING YOUR MIND.  In late July, 2010, LET GO NOW: EMBRACING DETACHMENT  was released.  Currently Karen is working on her memoir.  More here.
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Mellow Yellow Goose

“We cannot do everything at once but we can do something at once.”
– Calvin Coolidge

Mellow Yellow Goose

Watercolor & Sharpie

This is another little bird painting I did a couple weeks ago.    It’s so fun to paint birds.   You can add a ton of detail or keep it simple.  Just play.

Boy, that is a great quote.  I seem to have so much on my plate that the only way I can manage it, is to break it into chunks and attack one chunk at a time.  It was the same way in Atlanta.  AmericasMart has three huge buildings, with a total of 800,000 square feet.  Building 1 has 20 floors, building 2 has 18 floors and building 3 has 13.  Building 2 even has a west wing with 11 floors.  Each floor is really huge.  To give you an idea, the second floor of building 2 had 210 showrooms or booths!  It was a daunting task, to figure out where I wanted to go and who I wanted to see.  I did hours of planning before, and hours of note taking after the show each day.  If  I didn’t break it into chunks, I would have never been able to make the most of the experience.  I would still be trying to make my head stop spinning.

Mr. Coolidge had some great advice, didn’t he?  “We cannot do everything at once but we can do something at once.”

About Calvin Coolidge

John Calvin “Silent Cal” Coolidge was the thirtieth US president, ascending to the duty after the death of Warren Harding. He was born in Vermont on July 4, 1872. A woman once bet that she could get the tight-lipped Coolidge to say three words during dinner. His response: “You lose.” As president, he was a Federalist, believing in local self-rule, though he lowered taxes and reduced the national debt, inciting the growth of the Roaring Twenties. He died in 1933.