Elsie the Locust – 5″ x 7″ Watercolor and Sharpie

“It takes as much energy to wish as it does to plan.”
– Eleanor Roosevelt

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2012

Elsie the Locust – 5″ x 7″ Watercolor and Sharpie

I didn’t name this locust.   ESP from Paint My Photo named it.  Believe it or not, these colors really are the colors on that bug.  I swear!  Even the pink.  🙂  My friend Leslie White shared this site (Paint My Photo) on her blog recently.  So of course I had to go see.   If you click on the ESP link above, you can see the locust photo.

About Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt, wife of president Franklin Delano Roosevelt, was a powerful political figure in her own right, crusading tirelessly for humanist causes. She was born in New York in 1884 and was orphaned young. After Franklin was struck by polio, she acted as his eyes and ears. She was central to the creation of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which she considered her crowning achievement, and wrote numerous essays, including a long-running column called “My Day.” She died in 1962.

I just finished a book by Ms. Roosevelt where she talked about the years immediately following the President’s death.  She was a remarkable woman.  I’m sure I’ll be reading more of her books.  –Beth

 

Red Tulips

“I could not, at any age, be content to take my place in a corner by the fireside and simply look on.”
— Eleanor Roosevelt

That quote reminds me of my late mother-in-law. When her husband died, we brought her down to the lake for a few days. After about a day, she said “I cannot sit here and look at this lake one more minute. Take me back to the city.” She was a hoot!  Absolutely a city girl.  🙂

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2012

Red Tulips – 5″ x 7″ Inktense Pencils

My hubby went outside with the chainsaw to cut a few trees.  I didn’t want to take my eyes off him for long with that tool because he is not exactly steady on his feet.  I sat at the window and did this little painting while I was watching him work.  Hey… it was cold out there.  😉

Eleanor Roosevelt

“Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home – so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world. Yet they are the world of the individual person; the neighborhood he lives in; the school or college he attends; the factory, farm, or office where he works. Such are the places where every man, woman, and child seeks equal justice, equal opportunity, equal dignity without discrimination. Unless these rights have meaning there, they have little meaning anywhere. Without concerted citizen action to uphold them close to home, we shall look in vain for progress in the larger world.”

Eleanor Roosevelt

More on Ms Roosevelt here.

Yogi Bear in Oil Pastel

“We gain strength, and courage, and confidence by each experience in which we really stop to look fear in the face… we must do that which we think we cannot.”
–Eleanor Roosevelt

Oooooo… Good one!  🙂

Yogi Bear in Oil Pastel – 4″ x 6″ Postcard

So I have gone a whole 2 weeks without doing any art.  I don’t know how much longer I can do it.  I guess I just have to get up earlier and paint a little something before I study tomorrow.  I’m going to go fly, too, if the plane is available.  I have to get this done.    Once I get my Private Pilot’s  Certificate, maybe life can return to normal.  Who am I kidding?  Then it will be time for some adventures!  😀

Eleanor Roosevelt

“Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home – so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world. Yet they are the world of the individual person; the neighborhood he lives in; the school or college he attends; the factory, farm, or office where he works. Such are the places where every man, woman, and child seeks equal justice, equal opportunity, equal dignity without discrimination. Unless these rights have meaning there, they have little meaning anywhere. Without concerted citizen action to uphold them close to home, we shall look in vain for progress in the larger world.”

Eleanor Roosevelt

Although she had already won international respect and admiration in her role as First Lady to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt’s work on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights would become her greatest legacy. She was without doubt, the most influential member of the UN’s Commission on Human Rights.  More…

Belize City Street Market

“In the long run, we shape our lives, and we shape ourselves.  The process never ends until we die.  And the choices we make are ultimately our own responsibility.”
–Eleanor Roosevelt

Yeah!!!  That’s what I was talking about yesterday!  🙂

Belize City Street Market – 5″ x 7″ Watercolor

This reference was super busy, with cars and junk everywhere.  I wanted to practice people, in the simplest form, so I eliminated a lot of stuff.  I have the buildings and perspective all wrong, but it was the people I was after.    I had a great time with this reference by KreativeKay at WetCanvas.   Oh, I added the dog and chickens from two of Kay’s  other photos.  They just wanted to be in the painting, and since I removed the cars, there was no danger of them getting run over.  😀

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt  October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was the First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945. She supported the New Deal policies of her husband, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and became an advocate for civil rights. After her husband’s death in 1945, Roosevelt continued to be an international author, speaker, politician, and activist for the New Deal coalition. She worked to enhance the status of working women, although she opposed the Equal Rights Amendment because she believed it would adversely affect women.

In the 1940s, Roosevelt was one of the co-founders of Freedom House and supported the formation of the United Nations. Roosevelt founded the UN Association of the United States in 1943 to advance support for the formation of the UN. She was a delegate to the UN General Assembly from 1945 and 1952, a job for which she was appointed by President Harry S. Truman and confirmed by the United States Senate. During her time at the United Nations she chaired the committee that drafted and approved the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. President Truman called her the “First Lady of the World” in tribute to her human rights achievements.

Active in politics for the rest of her life, Roosevelt chaired the John F. Kennedy administration’s ground-breaking committee which helped start second-wave feminism, the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women. In 1999, she was ranked in the top ten of Gallup’s List of Most Widely Admired People of the 20th Century.  (Wikipedia)

Impressionist Rose Garden

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.”
– Eleanor Roosevelt

Impressionist Rose Garden – Oil Pastel

Here is my little attempt at Impressionism.   It’s oil pastel on black pastel paper.  I thought it was fun, but it is so not me.    For the first 2 years after I started painting again (after a 30 year break) I was trying everything I saw.  I grew in leaps and bounds during that time … and so did my art supply stash!  🙂

About Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt, wife of president Franklin Delano Roosevelt, was a powerful political figure in her own right, crusading tirelessly for humanist causes. She was born in New York in 1884 and was orphaned young. After Franklin was struck by polio, she acted as his eyes and ears. She was central to the creation of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which she considered her crowning achievement, and wrote numerous essays, including a long-running column called “My Day.” She died in 1962.

Peugot 202 1948

“Remember, no one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”
Eleanor Roosevelt

Peugot 202  1948

5″ x 7″ Watercolor on Strathmore cold press paper

This painting is a venture into new frontier for me.  On Leslie White’s blog, I became fascinated by a technique she was using, creating a pathway of light by leaving that pathway white and painting into it.  It’s something she learned from Don Andrews, watching his DVDs.    Of course, I rushed right out and bought his book,  Interpreting the Landscape in Watercolor.

When I received the book, I was so excited.  I tried his suggestion and did a 10 minute value study first.  I have never actually done a value study, being a self taught watercolorist.    So here is my attempt to find a pathway of light.

He says that we, as the artist, can create the pathway that we like.  We don’t have to take the reference at face value.  The stuff I outlined is the places I wanted to use to create my path.

There was so much more, like painting wet and softening the edges of the colors and letting them blend into each other.  I played with some of that, too.  I am not patient, so I dove in before I read any further.  I can’t wait to see what else he teaches me, once I actually read the book.  😀

Eleanor Roosevelt

“Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home – so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world. Yet they are the world of the individual person; the neighborhood he lives in; the school or college he attends; the factory, farm, or office where he works. Such are the places where every man, woman, and child seeks equal justice, equal opportunity, equal dignity without discrimination. Unless these rights have meaning there, they have little meaning anywhere. Without concerted citizen action to uphold them close to home, we shall look in vain for progress in the larger world.”

Eleanor Roosevelt

Read more about Mrs. Roosevelt here.

Shattered

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.”
– Eleanor Roosevelt

Shattered

2.5″ x 3.5″ Watercolor ATC

The perspective on this one doesn’t seem quite right, but I had a great time doing the broken glass.   So… just pretend the perspective is working.  *giggle*   🙂

Check out Leslie White’s beautiful window here.  She uses such beautiful color!

About Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt, wife of president Franklin Delano Roosevelt, was a powerful political figure in her own right, crusading tirelessly for humanist causes. She was born in New York in 1884 and was orphaned young. After Franklin was struck by polio, she acted as his eyes and ears. She was central to the creation of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which she considered her crowning achievement, and wrote numerous essays, including a long-running column called “My Day.” She died in 1962.