Pink Dog – Wooden Puzzle

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“Behold the turtle. He makes progress only when he sticks his neck out.”
– James Bryant Conant

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Copyright Beth Parker Art 2013

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2013

Pink Dog – Wooden Puzzle

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I did a few of these puzzles as my donation to an animal welfare fundraiser.  They were fun and I’d like to do some again one day!  🙂

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About James Bryant Conant

James Bryant Conant, the American chemist and educator, is known both for his role in the Manhattan Project — which developed the first nuclear weapons — and for his innovative tenure as president of Harvard University. Harvard had been a finishing school for the rich; Conant turned it into a world-class research university and created aptitude tests to choose students by ability. These tests became the basis for the SAT. He was born in Massachusetts in 1893 and died in New Hampshire in 1978.

4 Paws Facing Southwest – Painting Stages

“Experience is not what happens to a man. It is what a man does with what happens to him.”

Aldous Huxley

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2013

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2013

4 Paws Facing Southwest –  5″ x 5″  – Painting Stages

I painted this little painting from the driveway of the cabin I stayed in during my 2011 Driggs, Idaho visit.  It’s 5″ x 5″ and I’ve included the progress shots of the stages.  First, I took a panel that I had painted earlier with black gesso.  I drew the lines on with chalk that I wanted to stay black.  Then, with Golden Fluid Acrylic, I painted the underpainting.  I come in and add color after that.  Layers and layers and layers of glazing (with Golden Fluid Acrylic) later, I end up with the finished painting.  These little acrylics are better in person.  🙂

About Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley, the cerebral English writer and social critic, is best known for his dystopian novel Brave New World, about a theoretically ideal society that stamps out individuality. He was born in Surrey on July 26, 1894. His teen years were difficult: His mother and sister died when he was 14 and a few years later, he became nearly blind. After early success with fiction, he switched to essays and screenplays, moving to California and becoming a kind of guru for the 60’s counterculture movement. He died on November 22, 1963.

 

4 Paws West View – Driggs, Idaho

Change and growth take place when a person has risked himself and dares to become involved with experimenting with his own life.
Herbert Otto

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2013

Copyright Beth Parker Art 2013

4 Paws West View – 8″ x 8″ Acrylic on Panel

Since I have Idaho on my mind, I thought I would share another painting from my Driggs visit in 2011.  I painted this while I was there at the 4 Paws cabin.  It’s my interpretation of the view to the west of the cabin.   I am so excited that I’m spending time in Driggs this summer, especially since it will probably be 110 degrees here in Oklahoma.  During their heat wave in August of 2011… it was 90.  😀

I really love that quote by Herbert Otto, but I couldn’t determine what Herbert Otto to credit this quote to.  Yes!  There was more than one Herbert Otto when I googled him.  Who knew?

 

Cheesecloth Cat

“Anxiety does not empty tomorrow of it’s sorrow, but only empties today of it’s strength.”
— Charles Spurgeon

Cheesecloth Cat – 4″ x 6″ Mixed Media

Okay… I know… corny.  Just sharing fun with cheesecloth that I did the same weekend that I did the bug from yesterday.  🙂

Have a great day!

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834-92) was England’s best-known preacher for most of the second half of the nineteenth century. In 1854, just four years after his conversion, Spurgeon, then only 20, became pastor of London’s famed New Park Street Church (formerly pastored by the famous Baptist theologian John Gill). The congregation quickly outgrew their building, moved to Exeter Hall, then to Surrey Music Hall. In these venues Spurgeon frequently preached to audiences numbering more than 10,000—all in the days before electronic amplification. In 1861 the congregation moved permanently to the newly constructed Metropolitan Tabernacle.
    Spurgeon’s printed works are voluminous, and those provided here are only a sampling of his best-known works, including his magnum opus, The Treasury of David. Nearly all of Spurgeon’s printed works are still in print and available from Pilgrim Publications, PO Box 66, Pasadena, TX 77501.

4 Paws to the West – 8″ x 8″ Acrylic

“I have always believed that whatever good or bad fortune may come our way we can always give it meaning and transform it into something of value.”
– Hermann Hesse

I like that!

4 Paws to the West – 8″ x 8″ Acrylic on Black Gessoed Aquaboard

This is my favorite of the three acrylics I did from my 4 Paws vacation cabin.  I literally sat out in front of the cabin and sketched it with chalk onto the black aquaboard.  I took my artistic liberties, of course, but the view was that spectacular.   They are still doing the square bales there, and everybody had huge stacks of them, stored up for winter.  I’m sure people thought I was weird, taking photos of hay.  I just loved it!  😀

It was such an inspiring place to have my own private painting retreat.  I can’t wait to go back there!

Here are the progress shots…

I hope you have a wonderful Labor Day weekend.  Be safe.  🙂

About Hermann Hesse

Hermann Hesse, the Pulitzer Prize–winning German writer, became extremely popular in the 1960’s and 1970’s for his deeply spiritual novels spiked with Eastern philosophy. He is best known for the novels Siddhartha, The Glass Bead Game, and Steppenwolf. He was born in 1877 in Germany and immigrated to Switzerland in 1912. Hesse was exposed to Eastern thought from childhood: His grandfather taught Indian studies, and his mother had been born in India. He won the Noble Prize in Literature in 1946. He died in 1962.

4 Paws Southwest – 5″ x 5″ Acrylic

“A bad habit never disappears miraculously; it’s an undo-it-yourself project.”
– Abigail Van Buren

4 Paws Southwest – 5″ x 5″ Acrylic on Black Gessoed Aquaboard

This is the view (from my brain) to the southwest of my wonderful 4 Paws vacation cabin in Driggs, Idaho.  What a wonderful place!   I haven’t worked on paintings like this for a while and I enjoy the process so much.  I used Golden Fluid Acrylics and apply many, many layers before they are done.

Here is the progress shots…

These little paintings really look better in natural light, but you kinda get the gist.  🙂

About Abigail Van Buren

Pauline Phillips, better known as Abigail Van Buren, wrote the syndicated “Dear Abby” column for 46 years. She was born in 1918 in Iowa. She had never written professionally when she contacted the San Francisco Chronicles editor and said she could do better than their current advice maven. Her version was an instant success. Her twin sister, Esther Lederer, became an advice columnist under the name Ann Landers. Phillips retired in 2002; her daughter, Jeanne Phillips, took over her column.

4 Paws East – 4″ x 4″ Acrylic

“All that is necessary to break the spell of inertia and frustration is this: Act as if it were impossible to fail.”
– Dorothea Brande

4 Paws East – 4″ x 4″ Acrylic on Black Gessoed Aquaboard

If you lived in my head, this is the view you could see when you looked due east from the beautiful little cabin (4 Paws) I stayed in, outside of  Driggs, Idaho last week.  This cabin was the most amazing place.  It went waaaay beyond my wildest expectations.   Next time I go, I’ll try to extend my stay at 4 Paws.  It was wonderful!

Here are some of the stages this painting took, on it’s way to being what you see above.

I even had some pink and some polka dots on those far yellow trees, before I came to my senses.  It really wasn’t working for me until I filled in the little woodsy area.  This is the view I enjoyed from my deck every day, including all the colorful wildflowers.  Can you say aaaaaaahhhhhhh?   😀

About Dorothea Brande

Dorothea Brande wrote the quintessential how-to-write book, Becoming a Writer, which was among the first to address every writer’s core problem: How to sit down and let the words flow. Her book, published in 1934, remains in print today. She was born in 1893 in Chicago. She worked as an editor on the Chicago Tribune and The American Review and married the latter journal’s owner. She also wrote Wake Up and Live, which was adapted into a movie in 1937. She died in 1948.

Dave the Blue Cat

“It is not enough to have great qualities;  We should also have the management of them.”
La Rochefoucauld

Dave the Blue Cat

4″ x 4″ Acrylic on Ampersand Artist Panel

I enjoyed doing this very much.  It was all done by loading my brush and squiggling the paint onto the black panel.

Hey, I am impressed that spell-check didn’t bust me on squiggling! hahaha  😀

La Rochefoucauld

(born Sept. 15, 1613, Paris, France — died March 16/17, 1680, Paris) French writer. Of a noble family, he joined the army at an early age and was wounded several times. He later played a leading part in the Fronde but gradually won his way back into royal favour. He turned his energies to intellectual pursuits and became the leading exponent of the maxime, a French form of epigram that concisely expresses a harsh or paradoxical truth. Maximes (five eds., 1665 – 78), his principal achievement, consists of 500 reflections on human behaviour. His Mémoires (1664) recount the plots and campaigns of mutinous nobles during the Fronde.

Bridgetown, Barbados

“Behold the turtle. He makes progress only when he sticks his neck out.”
– James Bryant Conant

Bridgetown, Barbados

8″ x 8″ Acrylic on Ampersand Artist Panel

This is Broad Street, from Valri Ary’s WDE at WetCanvas.  Of course, I waaaay simplified it.  There was a lot of noise and I couldn’t wrap my head around all of it.  Okay…. I didn’t know how to paint it.  🙂

I think I should have painted all the people with their arms up in the air, screaming, “Help me, I’m falling!”.  I had my perspective down pretty good, until I added the ground.  All the people should be sliding to their left.  Oh well.  I had fun and that’s what counts.  There are no perspective police in my world.  *giggle*

About James Bryant Conant

James Bryant Conant, the American chemist and educator, is known both for his role in the Manhattan Project — which developed the first nuclear weapons — and for his innovative tenure as president of Harvard University. Harvard had been a finishing school for the rich; Conant turned it into a world-class research university and created aptitude tests to choose students by ability. These tests became the basis for the SAT. He was born in Massachusetts in 1893 and died in New Hampshire in 1978.

Puppy Puzzle

“You can’t live a perfect day without doing something for someone who will never be able to repay you.”
John Wooden

Puppy Puzzle

5″ x 7″ Acrylic on Wooden Puzzle

I think this puzzle will probably get something else.  Remember when I said that about the Innocent Cat?    he he  That cat became quite a hit on facebook.

I had the most amazing flight last night!  I did a bunch of really good landings and I feel a solo coming.    Then this morning I got word that I am the official sign company for Carlton Landing.  I am thrilled about that!  It is a wonderful opportunity and I am very blessed!  Whoo-Hoo!!

I love this big wonderful life!!! 🙂

In looking for a biography on John Wooden, I discovered that he was an amazing person with a long, rich history.  All of the biographies were really long, so please click on the links here for more info.  He said some incredible things in his life, such as:

“Be true to yourself.
Make each day your masterpiece.
Help others.
Drink deeply from good books.
Make friendship a fine art.
Build a shelter against a rainy day.
Pray for guidance and give thanks for your blessings every day.”
John Robert Wooden

Born: 1910-10-14
Birthplace: Hall, Indiana

Race: White
Religion: Protestant
Field: Basketball
Famous for: Winningest-ever college coach

John Wooden Offical Website:
http://www.coachjohnwooden.com/

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